Tel: +62 21 2932 8217 - 18

Jl. DR Ide Anak Agung Gde Agung, Kav. E. 3.3, No. 3

Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Jakarta 12950, Indonesia

Thai Trade Center, Jakarta (DITP) (c) 2012

BUSINESS STARTUP GUIDE FOR THAILAND AND INDONESIA

This page provide a outline on the guide to individuals or companies seeking to startup a business in Thailand or Indonesia.

THAILAND BUSINESS STARTUP GUIDE

What You Need to Know About Setting up a Business in Thailand

 

The following is an overview of establishing a business in Thailand.

 

As in most countries, there are three kinds of business organizations in Thailand: Sole proprietorships, partnerships, and limited companies. The most popular form of business organization among foreign investors is the private limited company. Private limited companies require a minimum of three promoters and must file a memorandum of association, convene a statutory meeting, register the company, and obtain a company income tax identity card. They must also follow accounting procedures specified in the Civil and Commercial code,the Revenue Code and the Accounts Act.

 

A balance sheet must be prepared once a year and filed with the Department of Revenue and Commercial Registration. In addition, companies are required to withhold income tax from the salary of all regular employees.

 

The Ministry of Industry administers The Factory Act, which governs factory construction and operation, as well as safety and pollution-control requirements. In some cases, factories do not require licenses, in other instances the requirement is simply to notify officials in advance of start-up, and in some cases licenses are required prior to commencing operations. Licenses are valid for five years, and are renewable.

 

Thailand recognizes three kinds of intellectual property rights: patents, trademarks, and copyrights. The Patent Act protects both inventions and product designs and pharmaceuticals.The Copyright Act protects literary, artistic works, and performance rights, by making it unlawful to reproduce or publish such works without the owner's permission. The Trademark Act governs registration of, and provides protection for, trademarks.

 

The Alien Occupation Law requires all foreigners working in Thailand to obtain a Work Permit prior to starting work in the Kingdom, except when they are applying under the Investment Promotion Law, in which case they have 30 days to apply. Non-Immigrant visas provide the holder with eligibility to apply for a work permit, and allow the holder to work while the work permit application is being considered.

 

To view the full information, please click on the button below.